Kizomba

Kizomba was developed in Angola around the early 1980s and means "party" in the Kimbundu language. It evolved from traditional music such as semba, when the younger generations thought it needed a more modern, sensual touch. Once combined with an electric beat and a slow, sensual rhythm, kizomba was born.

This dance is pretty new to the salsa club scene when compared with the other Latin dances. Dance partners generally dance really close together and move in smooth sensual wavy movements, with much of the footwork being influenced by tango.


Kizomba
Kizomba

Kizomba was developed in Angola around the early 1980s and means "party" in the Kimbundu language. It evolved from traditional music such as semba, when the younger generations thought it needed a more modern, sensual touch. Once combined with an electric beat and a slow, sensual rhythm, kizomba was born.

This dance is pretty new to the salsa club scene when compared with the other Latin dances. Dance partners generally dance really close together and move in smooth sensual wavy movements, with much of the footwork being influenced by tango.


The Music

Its music is characterised by a slow and romantic rhythm, and usually sung in Portuguese, although English is becoming more common.

It often uses electronic percussion instruments and can be identified by a distinctive underline beat.


Take a listen to the examples to the right by clicking the play button. First listen to the well known song, then listen to its kizomba version that follows.

(Click the play icon along side the tracks above to listen to them)

Its music is characterised by a slow and romantic rhythm, and usually sung in Portuguese, although English is becoming more common. It often uses electronic percussion instruments and can be identified by a distinctive underline beat.

Take a listen to the examples below by clicking the play button. First listen to the well known song, then listen to its kizomba version that follows.

(Click the play icon along side the tracks above to listen to them)

The Basic Step

The basic step of the dance has the lead take two steps forward, then on the third beat, brings both feet together, tapping their foot. The lead then repeats, but going backwards, finishing where they started. The dancers should be in a similar hold to the one typically used in salsa, but where the lead rests their right hand below the follower's left shoulder, they rest it below the follower's right. Making for a lot closer hold.

The following video is a great introduction to the dance, covering foot work and how you hold your partner. Just stick with it past the initial introduction.



Watch It In Action

This couple are completely mesmerising to watch. The way they both move with each other and to the music just makes me want to get out there and dance each time I see them.



Top 5 Songs

(Click the play icon along side the tracks above to listen to them)

Preview my personal top five favourite tracks by clicking the play buttons to the left, or listen to the full playlist in Youtube below.

(Tracks are ordered starting from my most favourite.)


If you like what you hear you can purchase each song by clicking on the View button alongside the track you like on the left.



Preview my personal top five favourite tracks by clicking the play buttons above, or listen to the full playlist in Youtube below.

(Tracks are ordered starting from my most favourite.)

If you like what you hear you can purchase each song by clicking on the View button alongside the track you like above.



What's Your Favourite Song?

Are there songs in this genre you really love listening or dancing to? Why not share your own top five tunes by entering them in the comments box below. And if enough visitors share their favourites I'll look to put together a visitor top songs list.



Salsa Dancers Latin Dances Kizomba